Amylin Analog Treatment

man injecting insulin into abdomen

Pramlintide helps control blood sugar levels after eating.

Pramlintide resembles amylin, which is normally released along with insulin from the pancreas.

Pramlintide is an injected medicine for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes that helps control blood sugar levels after eating.

Pramlintide (Symlin)

Pramlintide resembles the hormone, amylin that is normally released along with insulin from the pancreas. In type 2 diabetes, amylin levels may be reduced.

Some people get certain side effects (such as nausea, vomiting and low blood sugar) when starting pramlintide, therefore the starting dose is small to allow the body to adjust to this new medicine.

In short, pramlintide lowers glucagon during a meal, slows food emptying from the stomach and curbs the appetite.

Side Effects

Some people get certain side effects (such as nausea, vomiting and low blood sugar) when starting pramlintide, therefore the starting dose is small to allow the body to adjust to this new medicine.

In type 2 diabetes, the initial dose is 60 micrograms (10 units on the insulin syringe), taken before meals. After 3 days, if you tolerate the medicine, the dose may be increased to 120 micrograms (20 units on the insulin syringe) before meals. Pramlintide is available in a vial and pen form.

If you are treated with insulin releasing pills and starting pramlintide:

  • Reduce the insulin releasing pill dose by half or more. Ask your medical provider for exact recommendation.
  • Inject pramlintide just before eating; it is taken three times daily.

If you are treated with insulin and starting pramlintide:

  • Reduce your mealtime insulin dose by half or more to prevent a low blood sugar. Ask your medical provider for exact recommendation.
  • If using an insulin pump, extending the meal bolus to 1 ½ or 2 hours may prevent early post meal hypoglycemia and late post meal hyperglycemia related to the delayed stomach emptying.
  • Inject pramlintide at the same time you inject insulin, but at a different injection site.
  • Do not mix pramlintide with insulin in the same syringe.

The most common side effects are:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Headache
  • Low blood sugar, if also taking insulin

If you have side effects, contact your medical provider immediately.

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